Review: Drobo FS Network Storage Array

Drobo1.jpg

Wow, that title’s a mouthful — Network Storage Array — but don’t let that technical-jargony sounding term scare you, this Drobo FS device is really as easy to use as your Fridge. And for me, that’s a Holy Grail — something that you use and basically forget the complexity.

Whut?
But let me back up a moment and describe what a Network Storage Array (or NAS – Network Attached Storage) device is.

Basically, it’s a box with a bunch of hard drives in it, and some network intelligence. You connect your NAS to your home or office network, and it appears to your computers as if it’s another computer on your network that’s sharing some drives.

You copy stuff to your NAS and share files with any other computer on your network.

Pretty simple, yet difficult to do well

And this is where things get a little squirrely. Some people have a household with mixed computers sharing the same network. In my case, I’ve got Windows (2 varieties), OSX and Linux machines. And some network storage devices don’t play well with different machines on the same network. Sure, the box may say Win/Mac, but invariably issues arise. Not so with the Drobo FS. Continue reading “Review: Drobo FS Network Storage Array”

Three tools to trick out your digital darkroom

It’s no secret that I’m a bit of a photo geek. I’ve been taking pictures since I was old enough to understand what f-stop was, and had my first wet darkroom in my parents basement bathroom before I was out of elementary school — and no, I wasn’t held back 🙂 So I’ve been following the development of digital darkroom software and hardware reasonably closely, but only recently have started getting ‘seriously’ back into it. And have discovered that there are three key ‘accessories’ to the digital darkroom workflow that I’m finding essential. …more



This post is an excerpt from one of my weekly posts on the Future Shop Techblog. Check out the full post here.


Portable computing with Portable Apps

Not everyone wants to lug a laptop around with them between classes or across town to a study session at the library. Or perhaps you’re moving between a work computer, your home computer and a remote worksite computer, yet want to make sure you’ve got your suite of regular-use tools at hand (’cause you certainly can’t guarantee they’ll be installed on computers you don’t control). This is where the concept of the ‘portable application’ comes to the rescue. …more



This post is an excerpt from one of my weekly posts on the Future Shop Techblog. Check out the full post here.