Oldschool Awesome — Sword and Sworcery brings it!

Night

With an allu­sion to a massive psy­cho­lo­gic­al exper­i­ment, the new Super­broth­ers Role Play­ing Game release, Sword & Swor­cery, brings a new / old 8bit look to iPad gam­ing. Oh, and the game can integ­rate with your Twit­ter account, extend­ing the game­play into the Social Media world.

While I down­load the app and start play­ing (for an upcom­ing review, of course), why don’t you check out this video and then read this excel­lent inter­view with the game’s cre­at­or / artist / anim­at­or, Craig D. Adams.

Audi­ence Cal­ib­ra­tion Pro­ced­ure from Super­broth­ers: Sword & Swor­cery on Vimeo.

Oh, almost for­got — it’s a Made in Canada game 🙂 or Art Pro­ject. Some­thing.

Update: Cur­rently iPad only, though an iPhone ver­sion is in the works.

I read the news today (oh boy)

If you’ve been without power and not heard the news today, The Beatles music lib­rary is now avail­able from Apple’s iTunes store for down­load.

Joy.

No, I’m not overly enthused by this, as I already own digit­al cop­ies of all the Beatles music that I’m inter­ested in. I bought them on CD years ago, and have since copied the music to my vari­ous .mp3 play­er devices. This is leg­al in Canada.

I’m not sure what addi­tion­al value there is in then in the music being avail­able through iTunes, oth­er than to make it easi­er to buy songs or albums con­veni­ently if you sud­denly real­ize you’ve got the Blue and Red albums, but are miss­ing the White.

Meh. It’s news, but it’s not the big news it’s being made out to be.

My device isn’t what it was yesterday.

Reactable_500.jpg

One of the neatest things about com­puters, and now port­able com­put­ing devices (like my iPad) is that with a quick down­load, the unit’s func­tion changes. If the prom­ise of port­able tab­let com­put­ing plays out, mobile tech­no­logy will be the next big wave in the tech biz. And why not, we’re only lim­ited by the ima­gin­a­tion of the applic­a­tion
developers.

I was reminded of this most recently when I noticed and explored vari­ety of music syn­thes­izers and ‘instru­ments’ for the iPad.

Some of these synth apps rep­lic­ate old­school elec­tron­ic sound engines of the ‘80s, and oth­er incor­por­ate new think­ing and tech­no­logy.

Con­tin­ue read­ing “My device isn’t what it was yes­ter­day.”

Interesting business model for eBook

Earli­er this week I found an eBook over on Zen­Hab­its. The book looks inter­est­ing and I’m look­ing for­ward to giv­ing it a read, but the think that caught my eye was the busi­ness mod­el; you can get the book for free. The whole book, as a down­load­able eBook. Free.

Now, there is a Premi­um ver­sion of the eBook avail­able that includes a lot more inter­est­ing look­ing con­tent.

This busi­ness mod­el reminds me of  ‘Director’s Cut’ DVDs. You get the basic movie, the Director’s cut, the out-takes, the concept art, maybe a mak­ing-of video, and dir­ect­or com­ment­ary, over and above the basic movie.

Con­tent you’re pay­ing a premi­um for.

So, this 27 chapter eBook is free, and the premi­um stuff looks like it might be worth pay­ing for, if you think it’ll add value to the basic con­tent in the eBook.

Well, I’m going to bite, and give it a read. It’s free. It may (or may not) entice me into check­ing out the premi­um ver­sion, but at the very least, I’ll get some ideas. And hope­fully learn some­thing.

And try and fig­ure out how this busi­ness mod­el really makes sense.

1. All 27 chapters of the free ebook
Along with a crap­load of extra mater­i­al …

2. How-to videos
Going into more depth on focus-related top­ics:

  • How to Single-task
  • Beat­ing the Fears of Dis­con­nect­ing
  • How to Find Still­ness & Dis­con­nect
  • Focus & Health, Part 1: eat­ing healthy and get­ting act­ive
  • Focus & Health, Part 2: sleep and stress

3. Audio inter­views with experts

4. Bonus chapters from Leo

  • cre­ativ­ity and prac­ti­cing deep focus
  • find­ing still­ness and reflec­tion
  • how to start changes on a broad­er level

5. Bonus chapters from oth­er writers

6. Bonus PDF guides

  • How to cre­ate new habits
  • Quick-start declut­ter­ing guide
  • Focused email guide

Space. The final frontier.

Winter in Canada means cold winter nights — nights that, if you’re on the prair­ies, are usu­ally cold, crisp and clear. Which means per­fect even­ings for star­gaz­ing. But if you’re tem­per­at­ure chal­lenged, live on the ‘wet’ coast, or are loc­ated in much cloud­i­er environs, then per­haps these two astro­nomy soft­ware applic­a­tions can help. Bonus points…they’re Linux, OSX and Win­dows rated. …more



This post is an excerpt from one of my weekly posts on the Future Shop Techb­log. Check out the full post here.

3 windows applications improve your desktop’s appearance

Lately I’ve been try­ing to keep my win­dows desktop icon and clut­ter free. In my case, this has meant that I’ve been sav­ing less to my desktop (my default save-to loc­a­tion) and more to work­ing dir­ect­or­ies. And, since a cluttered desktop reflects a cluttered mind, I like to think of this as a bit of per­son­al men­tal-floss. …more



This post is an excerpt from one of my weekly posts on the Future Shop Techb­log. Check out the full post here.

How to easily install essential applications on a new Windows 7 computer

It doesn’t mat­ter if you’ve upgraded from Vista or XP, or if you’ve bought a new Win­dows 7 based com­puter, you’re going to need to install some basic and essen­tial applic­a­tions on your new baby.

And this awe­some web­site makes it so, SO easy. 4 easy steps:

  • Vis­it the site
  • Select which applic­a­tions you want
  • Press the but­ton to start a down­load
  • Run the down­loaded applic­a­tion

Vis­it the site
Ninite.com is a very cool web app with a single func­tion: to make a cus­tom down­load­er and installer that will save you time and mouse­clicks to install com­monly used open-source and free applic­a­tions.

The page looks like this, a long list of applic­a­tions and util­it­ies, divided into sec­tions by applic­a­tion type.

Nin­ite includes everything from office suite applic­a­tions (Open Office, MS Office tri­al), image and  audio edit­ors, to sys­tem main­ten­ance util­it­ies, vir­us scan­ners, and media burn­ing tools.

Get your applic­a­tions
This couldn’t be sim­pler. Click on the apps or util­it­ies you want. Unfor­tu­nately there’s no link to a product over­view so if you’re not famil­i­ar with the applic­a­tion you will need to Google it.

Press the but­ton
This ini­ti­ates a bit of back-end magic at the site. A cus­tom download/installer applic­a­tion is built and sent to your com­puter. It con­tains all the inform­a­tion neces­sary to, when run, down­load and install (in back­ground) the applic­a­tions you selec­ted in the pre­vi­ous step.

Make it so
When  you run the installer, a win­dow opens show­ing you the pro­gress of the pro­cess. If you’re curi­ous, you can ‘show the details’ and each phase of the install can be viewed.

Why?
The big bene­fit for me is the time sav­ing and the click sav­ing. What would nor­mally take over an hour for a new install, basic­ally takes 2–5 minutes of my time, the rest hap­pens in back­ground while I do some­thing else. To quote from the developers:

Nin­ite runs on Win­dows XP/Vista/7 and works
in the back­ground 100% hands-free.

We install apps with default set­tings and
say “no” to browser tool­bars and oth­er junk.

All we do is install the latest ver­sions of the apps
you choose. Not even Nin­ite is installed.

How can that not be cool?