More Gagarin Goodness…

Earth

Earlier today I noticed the Google Doodle pointing to resources about Yuri Gagarin’s (and mankind’s) first orbit of the Earth.

A few moments ago @mynameiskate pointed me at the YouTube logo — modified too — and links to First Orbit a free feature-length movie about Gagarin’s flight:

A real time recreation of Yuri Gagarin’s pioneering first orbit, shot entirely in space from on board the International Space Station. The film combines this new footage with Gagarin’s original mission audio and a new musical score by composer Philip Sheppard.

Here’s a great writeup of the First Orbit project at National Geographic:

Posted on YouTube at midnight GMT on April 12, the roughly 108-minute film blends a few 1960s historic reels with modern shots taken from the International Space Station (ISS) by Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli. His video not only retraces Gagarin’s view from orbit, it shows Earth bathed in sunlight at the same angle the cosmonaut would have seen during his 1961 flight.

I guess I know what I’m doing this evening, streaming this video in HD through my Apple TV 🙂

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Have you backed up your data today?

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Today is World Backup Day, I’m told, but to be frank, every day you should be thinking about the safety of your data, there’s just too much of it that’s irreplaceable.

So, today, I’m going to take a quick look at some of the backup systems I use and have in place. Yes, I said systems. No one backup system is infallible, so redundancy is important.

And, of course, this is my thinking on the subject. You may have differing opinions, which is great, as long as you are backing up :smileyhappy:
Continue reading “Have you backed up your data today?”

Calling All Scientists – Google Science Fair Entry Deadline Looms


Well there’s only 5 days left (as I write this) for students world-wide complete their experiments, write-up their summaries, and create their supporting video (or slide presentation) for entry into the Google Science Fair (http://google.com/sciencefair).

I’m really looking forward to seeing the creativity shown in these entries — especially any that relate to living in a northern climate (yes, winter is going on way too long up here this year).

I’m also kind-of envious, one of the prizes is really awesome:

The Grand Prize winner(s) plus one parent or guardian per winner will win an amazing 10 day trip to the Galapagos Islands with National Geographic Expeditions. Traveling aboard the National Geographic Endeavour the winner(s) will visit Darwin’s living laboratory and experience up-close encounters with unique species such as flightless cormorants, marine iguanas, and domed giant tortoises.

And yes, back in the day, we didn’t have Science Fairs quite this cool, or technology quite this sophisticated to work with.

But just entering this contest exposes contestants to many of the base concepts of modern science; experimenting, learning, failing, trying again, and reporting on your results, all things that modern scientists do today.

Some days, I think i was born too soon. Oh, and check out this video for a bit more inspiration and information about Google’s Science Fair.

This is a sponsored post.

Emerging Tech: This magazine app knows what you like

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You’ve got an iPad and all the popular magazine, content, reading apps like Reeder, Flipboard, Pulse, and FLUD. Well now there’s a new one using technology from the University of British Columbia’s Laboratory for Computational Intelligence.

It’s called Zite, and is it ever cool. But first, the video.

Why I like it
It’s a learning app. Log in to your Google Reader and Twitter account, let Zite perform a bit of analysis, and you’ve got content that Zite thinks you’re interested in. And it’s free 🙂