More Gagarin Goodness…

Earth

Earli­er today I noticed the Google Doodle point­ing to resources about Yuri Gagarin’s (and mankind’s) first orbit of the Earth.

A few moments ago @mynameiskate poin­ted me at the You­Tube logo — mod­i­fied too — and links to First Orbit a free fea­ture-length movie about Gagarin’s flight:

A real time recre­ation of Yuri Gagarin’s pion­eer­ing first orbit, shot entirely in space from on board the Inter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion. The film com­bines this new foot­age with Gagarin’s ori­gin­al mis­sion audio and a new music­al score by com­poser Philip Shep­pard.

Here’s a great writeup of the First Orbit pro­ject at Nation­al Geo­graph­ic:

Pos­ted on You­Tube at mid­night GMT on April 12, the roughly 108-minute film blends a few 1960s his­tor­ic reels with mod­ern shots taken from the Inter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion (ISS) by Itali­an astro­naut Paolo Nespoli. His video not only retraces Gagarin’s view from orbit, it shows Earth bathed in sun­light at the same angle the cos­mo­naut would have seen dur­ing his 1961 flight.

I guess I know what I’m doing this even­ing, stream­ing this video in HD through my Apple TV 🙂

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Have you backed up your data today?

backup.jpg

Today is World Backup Day, I’m told, but to be frank, every day you should be think­ing about the safety of your data, there’s just too much of it that’s irre­place­able.

So, today, I’m going to take a quick look at some of the backup sys­tems I use and have in place. Yes, I said sys­tems. No one backup sys­tem is infal­lible, so redund­ancy is import­ant.

And, of course, this is my think­ing on the sub­ject. You may have dif­fer­ing opin­ions, which is great, as long as you are back­ing up :smileyhappy:
Con­tin­ue read­ing “Have you backed up your data today?”

Calling All Scientists — Google Science Fair Entry Deadline Looms


Well there’s only 5 days left (as I write this) for stu­dents world-wide com­plete their exper­i­ments, write-up their sum­mar­ies, and cre­ate their sup­port­ing video (or slide present­a­tion) for entry into the Google Sci­ence Fair (http://google.com/sciencefair).

I’m really look­ing for­ward to see­ing the cre­ativ­ity shown in these entries — espe­cially any that relate to liv­ing in a north­ern cli­mate (yes, winter is going on way too long up here this year).

I’m also kind-of envi­ous, one of the prizes is really awe­some:

The Grand Prize winner(s) plus one par­ent or guard­i­an per win­ner will win an amaz­ing 10 day trip to the Galapa­gos Islands with Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Exped­i­tions. Trav­el­ing aboard the Nation­al Geo­graph­ic Endeav­our the winner(s) will vis­it Darwin’s liv­ing labor­at­ory and exper­i­ence up-close encoun­ters with unique spe­cies such as flight­less cor­mor­ants, mar­ine iguanas, and domed giant tor­toises.

And yes, back in the day, we didn’t have Sci­ence Fairs quite this cool, or tech­no­logy quite this soph­ist­ic­ated to work with.

But just enter­ing this con­test exposes con­test­ants to many of the base con­cepts of mod­ern sci­ence; exper­i­ment­ing, learn­ing, fail­ing, try­ing again, and report­ing on your res­ults, all things that mod­ern sci­ent­ists do today.

Some days, I think i was born too soon. Oh, and check out this video for a bit more inspir­a­tion and inform­a­tion about Google’s Sci­ence Fair.

This is a sponsored post.

Emerging Tech: This magazine app knows what you like

screner

You’ve got an iPad and all the pop­u­lar magazine, con­tent, read­ing apps like Reed­er, Flip­board, Pulse, and FLUD. Well now there’s a new one using tech­no­logy from the Uni­ver­sity of Brit­ish Columbia’s Labor­at­ory for Com­pu­ta­tion­al Intel­li­gence.

It’s called Zite, and is it ever cool. But first, the video.

Why I like it
It’s a learn­ing app. Log in to your Google Read­er and Twit­ter account, let Zite per­form a bit of ana­lys­is, and you’ve got con­tent that Zite thinks you’re inter­ested in. And it’s free 🙂