Another way to count the vote

Victor

Canada isn’t the only nation hav­ing an elec­tion in May. Folks in the United King­dom go to the polls on May 5th — and when they do, they’ll not only be select­ing their lead­ers, they’ll be vot­ing on a ref­er­en­dum to change they way votes are coun­ted. And this has the chance to really make your trip to the polling sta­tion, and the act of cast­ing a vote, much more valu­able.

You see, I find this inter­est­ing as I’d nev­er really con­sidered weight­ing my vote before. Yes, it makes per­fect sense to rank your can­did­ates in order of pref­er­ence, but for some reas­on, it’s just not done here. If it were, I’d have much more interest in find­ing out more about the can­did­ates in my rid­ing and vot­ing for the per­son, instead of the party or the lead­er.

If you’re won­der­ing what I’m talk­ing about, check out this video explain­ing the United King­dom ref­er­en­dum on the vot­ing pro­cess.

Note, this is a paid post (I get pen­nies per view; but only if you’re view­ing the video from the UK) but frankly, I think it’s an inter­est­ing enough concept that we in Canada should look at and con­sider this type of sys­tem. I think it would make me feel that my vote is more mean­ing­ful.

Your thoughts?

What is it about a Moleskine?

ms1.jpgIt’s a note­book, plain and simple. A very well-made note­book, to be sure. It is, per­haps, a premi­um note­book (which would jus­ti­fy the price). I know, I have one. And it’s quite nice.

Yet, Mole­skine is also a brand that brings a lot of emo­tion and sen­ti­ment to the humble note­book. Note­books are about remem­ber­ing things, writ­ing them down to have later — and the Mole­skine brand is based around the concept of being the best note­book you can use to remem­ber. Just check out this descrip­tion from the Mole­skine website’s about page:

Mole­skine was cre­ated as a brand in 1997, bring­ing back to life the legendary note­book used by artists and thinkers over the past two cen­tur­ies: among them Vin­cent van Gogh, Pablo Picas­so, Ern­est Hem­ing­way, and Bruce Chatwin. A trus­ted and handy travel com­pan­ion, the name­less black note­book held invalu­able sketches, notes, stor­ies, and ideas that would one day become fam­ous paint­ings or the pages of beloved books.

 

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Today, the name Mole­skine encom­passes a fam­ily of nomad­ic objects: note­books, diar­ies, journ­als, bags, writ­ing instru­ments and read­ing accessor­ies, ded­ic­ated to our mobile iden­tity. Indis­pens­able com­pan­ions to the cre­at­ive  pro­fes­sions and the ima­gin­a­tion of our times: they are intim­ately tied to the digit­al world.

 

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A lot of fam­ous people use(d) Mole­sk­ines, and a lot of people wax elo­quently about the vir­tues of the note­book.

And now, they can do the same about the free offi­cial Mole­skine app, for iPad and iPhone / iPod Touch:

The offi­cial Mole­skine App for iPhone and iPad allows you to express your cre­ativ­ity through text, images and sketches. Pick a clas­sic Mole­skine note­book paper style, cre­ate a new thought and start to type or draw choos­ing amongst dif­fer­ent col­ors and sizes. Once you are done with your thought, you can store it on your device and make edits whenev­er you want.

Fea­tures:

  • Pick a Mole­skine note­book paper style: plain, ruled, squared
  • Write and edit a text note
  • Sketch­ing tool
  • Insert and play with your per­son­al images
  • Cata­logue as many memor­ies as you want with a full range of cat­egor­ies
  • Play with images provided by Mole­skine
  • Geo-tag each note cre­ated and cre­ate a vir­tu­al map of your memor­ies
  • Share your notes with friends through email or social net­works

Of course, the Mole­skine app is also a mar­ket­ing tool to get the Mole­skine name on your iOS device, get you com­fort­able and famil­i­ar with the Mole­skine name, and pre­sum­ably get you curi­ous about the actu­al paper note­book.

Mar­ket­ing aside, the app is a fairly good note­book app, with some inter­est­ing fea­tures. And it’s free, so what have you got to lose — maybe it’ll work for you, as the ori­gin­al note­book worked for Hem­ing­way, back in the day.
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Unleash your inner Spielberg

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I’m sure all of us have, at one point or anoth­er, dreamed of releas­ing that movie dir­ect­or deep inside, and mak­ing our own movie, com­plete with music and spe­cial effects.

Well, if your dream is to make one that hearkens back to the golden days of silent cinema, then I’ve got an inex­pens­ive app for you.

Silent Film Dir­ect­or, released today, can help you make movies in a style remin­ensent of the clas­sic Hol­ly­wood sil­ver screen.

It’s a very slick app that lets you shoot, edit and share movies on your iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad (in Uni­ver­sal mode). Con­tin­ue read­ing “Unleash your inner Spiel­berg”

I think I’ve bought my last desktop computer

A couple of years ago, I was all into and enjoyed build­ing desktop com­puters, pick­ing out the right video card, select­ing the best mother­board and gen­er­ally dig­ging deep into the innards of my future com­put­ing plat­form. And design­ing the per­fect ‘office’ com­put­ing envir­on­ment with short cable runs, ample power for my accessor­ies and lots of desktop space. Yes it was com­plex and involved and detailed, but it was a hobby — build­ing com­puters.

These days, I’m not so con­cerned about it. What I need to do on a com­puter hasn’t changed, but the com­put­ing industry has matured, my needs are now becom­ing much more main­stream, and the sig­ni­fic­ant dif­fer­ences between one com­pon­ent and anoth­er aren’t quite so sig­ni­fic­ant any more.

Put anoth­er way, what I have been doing and want to do on a com­puter, is now much more in demand by every­day con­sumers. And the hard­ware, is becom­ing much more homo­gen­eous. They’ve caught up. Wel­come to the future.

Honey, I shrunk the CPU
Moore’s Law has also caught up, to the point where the hard­ware is smal­ler, light­er, faster, and cheap­er to make. On today’s hard­ware you can have full audio and video edit­ing stu­di­os in the soft­ware that runs your phone. You can remotely pilot vehicles with your phone or mobile com­put­ing device, and you can eas­ily com­mu­nic­ate with any­one on the plan­et using any num­ber of mobile tech­no­lo­gies.

Any of the mod­ern note­book com­puters have all that stuff in a very tiny pack­age.

Home file shar­ing
It used to be that you had files on one com­puter, and you shared them with the oth­er. Both com­puters had to be on to share the files. Now, with ubi­quit­ous WiFi and home net­work stor­age appli­ances (basic­ally net­work-aware hard drives) in your house­hold, any com­puter or com­pat­ible device can access any doc­u­ment, video, mp3, at any time. No need to have a big Mas­ter Serv­er.

Print­ing
The same goes for net­work-aware print­ers. Most man­u­fac­tur­ers have WiFi mod­els avail­able that know how to play nice with your home net­work envir­on­ment. Again, no need for a com­puter dir­ectly con­nec­ted to a print­er.

Stor­age
I men­tioned home net­work stor­age above, but these days stor­age devices are dirt cheap. So much so that it’s become pos­sible for com­mer­cial busi­ness to be built up around the concept of offer­ing you free online stor­age of your doc­u­ments, pho­tos, music, whatever…for free.

And they won’t only store your files, they’ll give you free access to applic­a­tions and tools to cre­ate and edit your stuff. Again, I no longer have a need for a huge drive attached to a big desktop box — all this stuff is in the cloud.

One caveat
There’s only two real reas­on that I can think of for need­ing a ded­ic­ated desktop com­puter these days; high-qual­ity media cre­ation, and gam­ing.

If you’re into music mak­ing, video edit­ing, pho­to­graphy, art, design, any­thing that needs you to move masses of pixels or gigs of data around, the archi­tec­ture of a desktop com­puter box is more suited to that than many of the note­book com­puters on the mar­ket. And you’re likely using the com­puter in a pro­fes­sion­al set­ting as a pho­to­graph­er, com­poser and the like.

Gam­ing also is a hard­ware resource hog, and falls into that cat­egory as many of the same com­put­ing tasks in media cre­ation are also neces­sary in game cre­ation and play­ing. Of course, there are excep­tions — I’ve seen some very power­ful (and pretty) gam­ing laptops.

Inter­est­ing, but not enough
But gam­ing isn’t enough for me to build my desktop around it, any more. Con­sole gam­ing sys­tems have edged in with com­par­able graph­ics and game­play, on much big­ger screens than could fit on my desktop.

So it looks like my next new sys­tem, likely in a year or two, won’t be a power-suck­ing behemoth that sits under my desk. Rather, it’ll be some­thing small, light, can con­nect to desktop mon­it­ors, mice & key­boards, and the home net, yet is still port­able. And I think the same holds true for most of you too. Yes, wel­come to the future 🙂
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Oldschool Awesome — Sword and Sworcery brings it!

Night

With an allu­sion to a massive psy­cho­lo­gic­al exper­i­ment, the new Super­broth­ers Role Play­ing Game release, Sword & Swor­cery, brings a new / old 8bit look to iPad gam­ing. Oh, and the game can integ­rate with your Twit­ter account, extend­ing the game­play into the Social Media world.

While I down­load the app and start play­ing (for an upcom­ing review, of course), why don’t you check out this video and then read this excel­lent inter­view with the game’s cre­at­or / artist / anim­at­or, Craig D. Adams.

Audi­ence Cal­ib­ra­tion Pro­ced­ure from Super­broth­ers: Sword & Swor­cery on Vimeo.

Oh, almost for­got — it’s a Made in Canada game 🙂 or Art Pro­ject. Some­thing.

Update: Cur­rently iPad only, though an iPhone ver­sion is in the works.